Thanksgiving Exercise

Phm 6
That the communication of thy faith may become effectual by the acknowledging of every good thing which is in you in Christ Jesus.     KJV

Our faith becomes effective, ie, active or pwerful, as we acknowledge every good thing within us.

For most of God’s people, that is a high challenge. We are so frozen by fear of pride that we are not able to truly acknowledge whatever good thing God has wrought in us.

This ought not to be.

Rather than teach on pride/humility I would just like for us to exercise a little practice with this verse.

Each of us has gifts, talents, abilities that make us unique and give us a sense of accomplishment whenever we exercise them.

It is time to acknowledge them.

But, let’s not stop with ourselves. Let’s include someone else in our thanksgiving.

Here are the rules: 

  1. you must say one good thing about yourself–anything
  2. you must say one good thing about another person, and try to address it to that person
    (ie, Suzy, I like the way you always laugh at my jokes)
  3. if that person has a blog or website, you might want to leave them a little link-love, too when you comment
  4. you may comment as many times as you like through the week of Thanksgiving, but only leave one thing on each post.
  5. you do not have to return the compliment to one who said something about you

I’m going to leave this up for the week of Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving is a time for us to remember things that we are grateful for. Let us express our gratitude for who we are and for those who add something of themselves to our life.

You might want to send an e-mail to the person you compliment, and give them the link, because they may not read this blog. (I only average 20 hits/day.)

I have begun with the first comment.

There is the distinct possibility that we may learn more about this virtual community of which we are a part.

John 18–Blogged Bible Study

What is Truth?

Jn 18:38
Pilate saith unto him, What is truth?      KJV

Is it not interesting that Jesus did not respond to this question?

I imagine (please note that this is my imagination, not the Word!) that Pilate asked that question with a sneering attitude:
       “Humph! You Jews have one group that lords it over everyone else because they are sinners. And you have another group that thinks they are special because they are the only ones who know there is no resurrection. And you have another group who is looking for some sort of messiah to rescue them from Caesar’s rule. Each group claims to have the truth. So, Big Shot, what is truth?”

And since Jesus found no sincere asking, He did not respond. He had been responding. But not now.

He had already told everyone who would listen that He was the truth (John 14:6).

And had he answered Pilate with the truth of “I am,” would Pilate have been able to stand? (for more on this thought from another writer to this blog click here.)

There had to be a reason that Jesus did not reply, did not say anything.

Is it necessary that I always have a response or a retort to whatever is spoken in my direction?

Is it not possible that truth would be better served by my silence in some situations?

Must I always run off at the mouth?

Ps 141:3
Set a watch, O Lord, before my mouth; keep the door of my lips.     KJV

NOTE: Others also contribute to this study throughout the week. Go here to hear what the Spirit is saying to the churches

All of One

1 Co 12:13
For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one body, whether we be Jews or Gentiles, whether we be bond or free; and have been all made to drink into one Spirit.       KJV

The Lord is saying something significant to us in this passage that I find to be usually glossed over in many circles.

This is something that we all certainly give lip service to, but the experiential outworking is quite different.

We all admit that we are a part of the Body, and that anyone can be a part of that same Body. But, when it comes to accepting someone from the ‘outside’ into our own local fellowship, that is a different story.

There are many within the church who want that new person who was saved Saturday night to get cleaned up, get rid of their body piercings and their cigarettes and their sleeping partner before they can come to church on Sunday.

Or, there are those who look askance at someone from a different culture who dresses differently from the accepted norm.

We are all of One. We are each a part of that One.

Regardless of what we look like, or what we wear, or how we talk, each one who comes to the Lord is a part of the Body.

Nothing must change but their inward devotion to sin and their outward practice of the same.

But, many of the saints among us, especially those of a more staid bent, tend to keep their distance from the new ones coming into their midst.

Most of the changes that people look for are merely cultural and have little to do with the reality of being a Christian. For too long now, we have used our culture to inform our religion, rather than our religion informing our culture.

Will the Lord find this acceptable when we stand before Him?