YAKKITY YAK

Pondering the Principles of Proverbs

talking to much

 

Have you ever been around someone who talks too much?
How do we know what “too much” is?
Is it “too much” simply because I am tired of listening?
Is it “too much” because I don’t like the subject matter?
Is it “too much” because I can’t get a word in?
How much is “too much?”

Good question.
Unfortunately, there are no hard and fast rules governing how much talking one is allowed before “crossing the line.”

Read more…

Words

Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.

I grew up believing that lie. Now as an adult, I still suffer the consequences of that deception.

Words can break the spirit. Words can wound. Words can kill.

Words can build up. Words can heal. Words can give life.

Pro 18:21

Death and life are in the power of the tongue, and those who love it will eat its fruits.

It is very important that we learn to think about and listen to what we are saying.

Gracie and I are in a tremendous battle to gain healing from a fight we had yesterday. Words were part of the cause for the pain we both experienced.

So, this morning, on the way to church, I had a good example of how important it is for me to guard my speech and to choose the right words.

I went out to the car ahead of her, and decided to let her drive. So, I got in on the passenger side. The car was running when she came down the stairs. Since she was in heels, she was carefully watching where she was going, walking with that beautiful grace she has. She was coming to the passenger side when I called out, “Wrong side.”

Then I got to thinking about that, and broached the subject with her as we were driving along. I asked if she had felt ‘corrected’ by my statement of “wrong side.” She said no. But, can you agree with me that “Other side” might have been more appropriate? “Wrong” is a negative, corrective term. And even though I had no intention of correcting anything, it could have been perceived that way. Fortunately for us, since we are both very tender right now, she did not receive it that way.

Is this being too picky? Do I have to be concerned about every single little word and nuance before I speak?

For me, the answer is YES.

Jesus said, “The words that I speak are spirit and life.” (John 6:63)

Luk 6:40

“A disciple is not above his teacher, but everyone when he is fully trained will be like his teacher.”

It is my desire to be like the master to whom I am discipled.

God’s Home

Revelation 21:3-4  And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying: “Look! The residence of God is among human beings. He will live among them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them.

Yesterday (or two days ago if you are on the other side of the date line) millions of Christians heard something along the lines of, “Isn’t it wonderful to be in the house of the Lord?” And many of those same millions know–at least intellectually–the statement is untrue.

It is those kinds of things that we do and say out of habit that continue to perpetrate incorrect thoughts to the Body of Christ. It is those incorrect thoughts that help to weaken us in our pursuit of the Lord.

We know, and say a hearty Amen! when the truth of God’s temple is taught. Yet, we continue to use language that goes against the assimilation of that truth into the core of our being. Why?

Are we not willing to bring a conscious awareness to our speech? The tongue is a small yet strong member, according to James 3:5. It is difficult to control. Some would say even impossible to control. But, we should not buy into that negative thinking. We should try to make controlling the tongue of primary importance.

Am I making a mountain out of a molehill? Don’t we all know that when the preacher or worship leader asks if it’s good to be in the house of God, that we mentally make the transition to correct thinking? No, because if we did, then we would all shout out, “NO! It is good that the house of God is among us!”

The building that we call church is neither a church nor God’s house.

We are God’s temple. The other translations render this verse with the words residence, tabernacle, dwelling, and dwelling place. We are God’s house.

While there are other verses that teach the individual aspect of being the Lord’s temple, this verse specifically teaches that it is the corporate expression of the Body of Christ where God chooses to dwell.

I get the sense that the Lord is speaking to the Church in this hour about this aspect of our life together. Everywhere I read, as I listen to others, I hear about the corporate expression, community, or koinonia. It is the current emphasis of the Holy Spirit.

Do you sense the same importance? Why is this word coming now?

John 18–Blogged Bible Study

What is Truth?

Jn 18:38
Pilate saith unto him, What is truth?      KJV

Is it not interesting that Jesus did not respond to this question?

I imagine (please note that this is my imagination, not the Word!) that Pilate asked that question with a sneering attitude:
       “Humph! You Jews have one group that lords it over everyone else because they are sinners. And you have another group that thinks they are special because they are the only ones who know there is no resurrection. And you have another group who is looking for some sort of messiah to rescue them from Caesar’s rule. Each group claims to have the truth. So, Big Shot, what is truth?”

And since Jesus found no sincere asking, He did not respond. He had been responding. But not now.

He had already told everyone who would listen that He was the truth (John 14:6).

And had he answered Pilate with the truth of “I am,” would Pilate have been able to stand? (for more on this thought from another writer to this blog click here.)

There had to be a reason that Jesus did not reply, did not say anything.

Is it necessary that I always have a response or a retort to whatever is spoken in my direction?

Is it not possible that truth would be better served by my silence in some situations?

Must I always run off at the mouth?

Ps 141:3
Set a watch, O Lord, before my mouth; keep the door of my lips.     KJV

NOTE: Others also contribute to this study throughout the week. Go here to hear what the Spirit is saying to the churches

Speak Softly

Pr 15:1
A soft answer turneth away wrath: but grievous words stir up anger.      KJV

The Bible has much to say about our speech–the way we talk, the words we use, and how we use them.

This verse has much to say about the responses we engender with our words. If we would be conscious with our speaking, we could notice how people respond to us and gain insight into our own hearts. However, many of God’s people have bought into the New Age philosophy that says, “It’s their problem.”

“If they get angry, it’s their problem I didn’t do anything.” Isn’t that a cute way to once again avoid responsibility for our actions? Seems to work well for the ‘no-fault’ society in which we live.

This verse points out something different, though. It claims that if our words are grievous, then anger gets stirred up.

If your experience is that many get angry when you talk, then maybe you should look to yourself, and not to them. Maybe it is your ‘grievous’ words.

Grievous means: OT:6089
an earthen vessel; usually (painful) toil; also a pang (whether of body or mind)
(Biblesoft’s New Exhaustive Strong’s Numbers and Concordance with Expanded Greek-Hebrew Dictionary. Copyright © 1994, 2003, 2006 Biblesoft, Inc. and International Bible Translators, Inc.)

The first thing to notice is that the base meaning of the word is ‘earthen vessel.’ When we speak from ourselves and not from the spirit, then we are likely to stir up something unpleasant in the listener.

‘Soft answer’ is both tone and content. We can turn away wrath in ourselves and others with a soft answer. Learning to speak softly in this way will require practice over a long period of time for most of us. But, if you would like to see a shift in the way people respond to you, then it will be well worth the effort to put these concepts into practice.